Sources of Healthcare Waste

Sources of Healthcare Waste
•Hospitals
•Clinics
•Laboratories
•Research activities
•Nursing homes
•Acupuncturist
•Paramedic and ambulance services
•Animal research
•Blood banks
Mortuaries
•Autopsy centers
Other Sources of Healthcare Wastes
•Physicians’ offices
•Dental clinics
•Chiropractors
•Psychiatric hospitals
•Cosmetic piercing and tattooing
•Institutions for disabled persons
•Funeral services
•Home healthcare
•Define healthcare waste
•Describe sources and examples of healthcare
waste
•Describe general characteristics of healthcare
waste
•Identify where wastes are generated in your
facility
•Categorize the wastes into two general categories based on whether or not they pose a risk
•Describe general characteristics of the wastes
Definition of Healthcare Waste
What is healthcare waste?
– Total waste stream from major healthcare establishments and from minor scattered healthcare activities
General Types of Healthcare Waste
Healthcare waste can be
–Non-hazardous general wastes comparable to domestic waste (75-90% of healthcare waste in a health facility)
–Potentially hazardous waste or waste that is associated with some health risks
(10-25% of healthcare waste in
a health facility)
Sources of Healthcare Waste
•Hospitals
•Clinics
•Laboratories
•Research activities
•Nursing homes
•Acupuncturist
•Paramedic and ambulance services
•Animal research
•Blood banks
Mortuaries
•Autopsy centers
Other Sources of Healthcare Wastes
•Physicians’ offices
•Dental clinics
•Chiropractors
•Psychiatric hospitals
•Cosmetic piercing and tattooing
•Institutions for disabled persons
•Funeral services
•Home healthcare
Which Institutions Generate the Most
Amount of Healthcare Waste?
Categories of Healthcare Waste
•Sharps waste
•Infectious waste
•Pathological waste
•Pharmaceutical or cytotoxic waste
•Chemical waste
•Radioactive waste
•Non-hazardous/general waste
Examples of Healthcare Waste
Department Sharps Infectious and pathological waste Chemical, pharmaceutical and cytotoxic waste Non-hazardous or general waste
Medical ward Hypodermic needles, intravenous set needles; broken vials and ampoules Dressings, bandages, gauze, and cotton contaminated with blood or body fluids; gloves and masks contaminated with blood of body fluids Broken thermometers and blood pressure gauges; split medicines; spend disinfectants Packaging, food scraps, paper, flowers, empty saline bottles, non-bloody diapers; non-bloody IV tubing and bags
Operating theatre Needles, IV sets, scalpels, blades, saws Blood and other body fluids; suction canisters; gowns, gloves, masks, gauze, and other waste contaminated with blood and body fluids; tissues, organs, foetuses, body parts Spent disinfectants Packaging, uncontaminated gowns, gloves, masks, hats and shoe covers
Laboratory Needles; broken glass, Petri dishes, slides and cover slips; broken pipettes Blood and body fluids; microbiological cultures and stocks; tissue; infected animal carcasses; tubes and containers contaminated with blood or body fluid Fixatives; formalin; xylene, toluene, methanol, methylene chloride, and other solvents; broken lab thermometers Packaging; paper, plastic containers
Pharmacy store Broken bottles, broken thermometers Expired drugs, Spilled drugs Empty containers Packaging; paper, empty containers
Radiology Silver; fixing and developing solutions; acetic acid; glutaraldehyde Packaging, paper
Chemotherapy Needles and syringes Bulk chemotherapeutic waste; vials, gloves and other material contaminated with cytotoxic agents; contaminated excreta and urine. IV sets containing chemotherapy drugs are cytotoxic waste Packaging, paper
Examples of Healthcare Waste
Department Sharps Infectious and pathological waste Chemical, pharmaceutical and cytotoxic waste Non-hazardous or general waste
Vaccination campaigns Needles and syringes Bulk vaccine waste; vials, gloves Packaging
Cleaning
Services Broken glass Disinfectants (glutaraldehyde, phenols, etc.), cleaners, spilled mercury, pesticides Packaging, flowers, newspapers, magazines, cardboard, plastic and glass containers, yard waste
Engineering Cleaning solvents, oils, lubricants, thinners, asbestos, broken mercury devices, batteries Packaging, construction or demolition waste, wood, metal
Food services Food scraps; plastic, metal and glass containers; packaging
Other sources:
Physicians’ offices Needles and syringes, broken ampoules and vials Cotton, gauze, dressing, gloves, masks and other materials contaminated with blood or other body fluids Broken thermometers and blood pressure gauges; expired drugs; spent disinfectants Packaging, office paper, newspapers, magazines, uncontaminated gloves and masks
Dental offices Needles and syringes, broken ampoules Cotton, gauze, gloves, masks and other materials contaminated with blood Dental amalgam; spent disinfectants Packaging, office paper, newspapers, magazines, uncontaminated gloves and masks
Home health care Lancets and insulin injection needles Bandages and other material contaminated with blood or other body fluids Broken thermometers Domestic waste
General Characteristics of Healthcare
Waste
•Total waste generated in hospitals:
2 – 4 kg per bed per day
•Infectious waste generated in hospitals with good segregation:
0.2 – 0.4 kg per bed per day
•Average bulk density of healthcare waste:
About 100 – 200 kg per cubic meter
General Characteristics of Healthcare Waste
•Typical breakdown of material constituents in healthcare waste (excluding food)
Country-specific HCW Generation
Country-specific Sources and Other
Characteristics
Discussion
•What do you consider as major or minor sources of healthcare wastes? Give some examples of healthcare wastes from these sources.
•How does your facility deal with the major categories of healthcare wastes (sharps, chemical, etc.)? Do you know of any interventions that can reduce exposure to healthcare wastes?
•Can you site some examples of mismanagement of wastes in your facility? If so, what can you do about this?
Open chat